Emily Williamson Statue

There is a plan for a statue of Emily Williamson, the founder of the Society for the Protection of Birds, which eventually became the RSPB, the UK’s largest conservation charity. It all started with her inviting friends for tea at her home in Didsbury so the statue will be erected in Manchester.

Several versions of the statue have been commissioned and you can vote for your favourite at the web address below. You can also make a donation towards the cost of the statue, if you wish.


 https://www.emilywilliamsonstatue.com/sculptorsshortlist

 

Looking and hoping for a brighter future

The group committee is constantly monitoring the changes to government policy with respect to Covid. We have noted the proposed changes coming later in July and, subject to them being confirmed, the committee is planning to meet in late July or early August to plan a way forward that both meets government guidelines and is considered safe for our members, recognising that the RSPB may have a viewpoint on what we can do.

The committee will be planning for a return to normal business from September 2021. We are hoping to produce an annual newsletter in August and the proposed first meeting in September will be a catchup AGM to tidy up group business and there will also probably be a presentation.

From September, we plan to start the collection of group membership subscriptions. The level of subscription may be subject to ratification by the AGM. The committee will also plan a programme of indoor and outdoor events for the period September 2021 – May 2022.

Please note that because of circumstances this may all change but we feel the need to prepare plans to start up our normal business arrangements as soon as possible.

Further reports will be provided on this website.

Group members find rare bird

On our first outdoor event of the new season, 14 members were the first to find a rare crake which was at the bottom of some reed beds on the Marshland Lagoon at Blacktoft Sands.

With the help of one of the local experts, it was established the bird was a little crake which has not been reported in Yorkshire since 1946. By the time the group left the site, there was a long queue outside the hide and the car park was full to overflowing. One of our members, Chas Harrison, was able to get a good picture which helped with the identification.